top of page

Groupe d'étude de marché

Public·77 membres
John Garza
John Garza

Lesson 6 Homework Practice Select An Appropriate Display


Lesson 6 Homework Practice Select An Appropriate Display




In this lesson, you will learn how to select an appropriate display for different types of data. A display is a way of showing data visually, such as a table, a graph, or a chart. Choosing the right display can help you organize, analyze, and communicate data effectively.




Lesson 6 Homework Practice Select An Appropriate Display



Types of Displays




There are many types of displays that you can use for data, but some of the most common ones are:


  • Line plots: A line plot shows the frequency of data values along a number line. It uses X marks or dots to represent each data value. Line plots are useful for showing the distribution and variation of numerical data.



  • Histograms: A histogram shows the frequency of data values in intervals or bins along a number line. It uses bars to represent the frequency of each interval. Histograms are useful for showing the shape and spread of numerical data.



  • Box plots: A box plot shows the five-number summary of numerical data: minimum, lower quartile, median, upper quartile, and maximum. It uses a box and whiskers to represent the range and variability of data. Box plots are useful for comparing the center and spread of different data sets.



  • Line graphs: A line graph shows how a variable changes over time or another continuous variable. It uses points connected by a line to represent the relationship between two variables. Line graphs are useful for showing trends and patterns in data.



  • Pie charts: A pie chart shows the relative sizes of parts of a whole. It uses sectors or slices to represent the percentage or fraction of each category. Pie charts are useful for showing proportions and comparisons of categorical data.



  • Bar graphs: A bar graph shows the frequency or amount of data in different categories. It uses bars to represent the value of each category. Bar graphs are useful for showing comparisons and contrasts of categorical data.



How to Select an Appropriate Display




To select an appropriate display for your data, you need to consider the following factors:


  • The type of data: Is your data numerical or categorical? Numerical data can be measured or counted, such as height, weight, temperature, etc. Categorical data can be grouped or classified, such as color, gender, favorite food, etc.



  • The purpose of the display: What do you want to show or emphasize with your display? Do you want to show the distribution, shape, center, spread, variation, outliers, trends, patterns, proportions, comparisons, contrasts, etc.?



  • The audience of the display: Who will see or use your display? What level of detail and complexity do they need or prefer? How can you make your display clear and easy to understand?



Based on these factors, you can choose a display that best suits your data and your goal. Here are some examples of how to select an appropriate display for different situations:


Situation


Type of Data


Purpose of Display


Appropriate Display


The record high temperature for each month this year


Numerical


Show trends and patterns over time


Line graph


The test scores each student had on a science test


Numerical


Show distribution and variation of scores


Histogram or line plot


The favorite topping on a pizza of the students in Mrs. Witsken's class


Categorical


Show proportions and comparisons of preferences


Pie chart or bar graph


Edmund's weight on his birthday over the past 10 years


Numerical


Show change and growth over time


Line graph


The company sales in millions for each year from 2004 to 2009


Numerical


Show comparisons and contrasts of performance over time


Bar graph or line graph


How to Make a Display




Once you have selected an appropriate display for your data, you need to follow some steps to make it. Here are some general steps that apply to most types of displays:


  • Collect and organize your data: Gather the data that you want to display and sort it into categories, intervals, or values. You can use a frequency table or a spreadsheet to organize your data.



  • Choose a scale and label the axes: Decide what units and intervals you will use to measure your data along the horizontal and vertical axes. Label the axes with the variable names and units.



  • Plot the data points or draw the bars or sectors: Use the scale and the data values to plot the points, draw the bars, or make the sectors that represent your data. Make sure the points, bars, or sectors are evenly spaced and proportional.



  • Add a title and a legend: Give your display a descriptive title that summarizes what it shows. If your display has more than one category or variable, add a legend that explains what each color or symbol means.



Depending on the type of display you choose, you may need to follow some additional steps or use some special tools. For example, to make a box plot, you need to find the five-number summary of your data and use a ruler to draw the box and whiskers. To make a pie chart, you need to find the percentage or fraction of each category and use a protractor to measure the angles of each sector.


How to Interpret a Display




A display is not only a way of showing data, but also a way of learning from data. To interpret a display, you need to look for patterns, trends, relationships, and differences in the data. Here are some questions that can help you interpret different types of displays:


  • Line plots and histograms: What is the shape of the data distribution? Is it symmetric, skewed, uniform, bimodal, etc.? What is the center and spread of the data? What are the mean, median, mode, range, etc.? Are there any outliers or gaps in the data?



  • Box plots: How does the box plot compare to other box plots? Which data set has a higher or lower median? Which data set has more or less variability? Which data set has more or less outliers?



  • Line graphs: What is the trend or pattern of the data over time or another variable? Is it increasing, decreasing, constant, periodic, etc.? What is the rate of change or slope of the line? Are there any peaks or valleys in the data?



  • Pie charts and bar graphs: What are the proportions or amounts of each category? Which category has the largest or smallest percentage or value? How do the categories compare or contrast with each other?



To interpret a display effectively, you need to use your critical thinking skills and your background knowledge. You also need to be aware of any limitations or biases that may affect the display, such as misleading scales, missing data, inaccurate measurements, etc.


---> ServiceClient failure for DeepLeo[/ERROR]


How to Evaluate a Display




To evaluate a display, you need to check if it meets the following criteria:


  • Accuracy: Does the display show the data correctly and completely? Are there any errors or omissions in the data or the display?



  • Clarity: Does the display show the data clearly and concisely? Is the display easy to read and understand? Are the labels, titles, legends, and scales appropriate and helpful?



  • Relevance: Does the display show the data that is relevant and important for the purpose and audience? Does the display highlight the main points or findings of the data?



  • Fairness: Does the display show the data fairly and objectively? Does the display avoid any misleading or biased representations of the data?



To evaluate a display effectively, you need to use your critical thinking skills and your background knowledge. You also need to be aware of any limitations or biases that may affect the display, such as misleading scales, missing data, inaccurate measurements, etc.


How to Improve a Display




To improve a display, you need to make some changes or adjustments based on your evaluation. Here are some possible ways to improve a display:


  • Change the type of display: If the type of display you chose is not appropriate for your data or your purpose, you can try a different type of display that suits your data better.



  • Change the scale or intervals: If the scale or intervals you used are too large or too small, you can change them to make your display more accurate and clear.



  • Add or remove details: If your display has too much or too little information, you can add or remove some details to make your display more relevant and concise.



  • Use colors or symbols: If your display is too plain or boring, you can use colors or symbols to make your display more attractive and interesting.



To improve a display effectively, you need to use your creativity skills and your background knowledge. You also need to consider the feedback and suggestions from others who see or use your display.


How to Apply a Display




To apply a display, you need to use it to answer questions, solve problems, or make decisions based on the data. Here are some examples of how to apply a display for different situations:


  • Line plots and histograms: You can use a line plot or a histogram to find the mean, median, mode, range, and other measures of central tendency and variability of a data set. You can also use them to compare the distributions of two or more data sets and identify any similarities or differences.



  • Box plots: You can use a box plot to compare the five-number summary of two or more data sets and identify any outliers. You can also use them to compare the center and spread of different data sets and determine which data set is more or less skewed.



  • Line graphs: You can use a line graph to analyze the relationship between two variables over time or another continuous variable. You can also use them to identify any trends or patterns in the data and predict future values based on the slope and intercept of the line.



  • Pie charts and bar graphs: You can use a pie chart or a bar graph to compare the proportions or amounts of different categories in a data set. You can also use them to make inferences or conclusions based on the data and support them with evidence.



To apply a display effectively, you need to use your problem-solving skills and your background knowledge. You also need to be aware of any assumptions or limitations that may affect the display, such as sampling methods, measurement errors, confounding variables, etc.


Conclusion




In this article, you have learned how to select an appropriate display for different types of data. You have also learned how to make, interpret, evaluate, improve, and apply different types of displays. By using these skills, you can organize, analyze, and communicate data effectively and efficiently.


In this article, you have learned how to select an appropriate display for different types of data. You have also learned how to make, interpret, evaluate, improve, and apply different types of displays. By using these skills, you can organize, analyze, and communicate data effectively and efficiently. d282676c82


https://www.cbcansw.org.au/group/cbca-nsw-branch-group/discussion/dcd46ca7-86fc-4684-9b4c-84ed4a041dbf

https://gitlab.com/moccecen/reliability/-/blob/master/.gitlab/merge_request_templates/Dxball2%23%23TOP%23%23%20Downloadfullversion.md

https://www.kankun.io/group/mysite-231-group/discussion/9a933a8b-b2d1-4669-ac1b-c58a7f14cf5a

https://www.zoeprior.com/group/zoe-prior-group/discussion/bc853ca6-b181-4be9-bbc6-2faf6e51c4aa

https://www.the120club.com/group/mysite-200-group/discussion/8d8399e3-af3d-4bb9-af09-83f7ae7e3eb6

https://www.brightspk.com/group/brightspk-group/discussion/a44ffe9d-ef1a-413a-a71b-1757651e4626

À propos

Bienvenue sur le groupe ! Vous pouvez entrer en contact avec...

membres

bottom of page